What’s the Best Dairy-Free Milk Alternative?

Whether you’re lactose intolerant, vegan, or just cutting out dairy for personal or environmental reasons, here’s a list of the best milk alternatives and what they work best with—because we’ve all made the mistake of putting almond milk in our tea and seeing it curdle.

Soy milk, also called soya milk, is the most accessible milk. Most places offer it as a milk alternative, and you can get it for pretty cheap at any supermarket. It’s also full of protein, and you can get so many different kinds: unsweetened, vanilla, chocolate, the list goes on.

Regular soy milk goes well with most things and can be used as a baking ingredient—but remember too much soy can be bad for your health if you have thyroid issues. Maybe alternate between soy and a different milk alternative!

Oat milk is the best for the planet: it doesn’t require a lot of land or water to be made. It’s also the most delicious in coffee, and tastes nice by itself too. Make sure you try chocolate oat milk once in your life—the Oatly one owns every chocolate milk lover’s heart. If you love having porridge in the morning, I suggest staying away from oat milk, it makes the oats go weird.

Almond milk is becoming just as popular and accessible as soy milk. It’s the milk alternative with the least calories, and it’s delicious by itself. It goes well with porridge and is great for baking too. It’s also fortified with vitamin B12, which is important for anyone staying away from animal products.

Unsweetened almond milk is tasty and better for everyday use if you’re trying to keep your sugars level low. The only issue with almond milk is the amount of water that is needed to cultivate almonds (which is still less than regular dairy milk).

Rice milk is the best for cereal, hands down. It’s naturally sweeter than other milk alternatives, but it’s also high in calories and carbs, so don’t go too wild with it if you’re worried about those things.

However, it’s still healthier than cow’s milk, and much better for the planet as well. Tip: warm rice milk before bed is relaxing and delicious.

Coconut milk is amazing in coffee, pancakes, smoothies and more. It’s thick and creamy, and often has added vitamin D and vitamin B12. Next time you go to Starbucks, get coconut milk in your Frappuccino. It will change your life.

Hemp milk isn’t a very popular option, but it’s a good one nonetheless. Don’t worry, it won’t get you high—it’s best in coffee and porridge, and it’s also a good source of omega 3. It smells and tastes a bit grassy, which throws many people off, but it’s really healthy.

Cashew milk is delicious in coffee, smoothies, curry sauce and soup. It’s easy to digest, low in calories and often fortified with several vitamins, so you don’t miss out on any nutrients. It’s creamy and tasty, and definitely worth trying.

What’s your favourite milk alternative?

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Bohemian Rhapsody: A Love Letter to Queen

As a result of the mixed reviews being published about Bohemian Rhapsody, I went into the theatre unsure of what to expect. I had heard the pace was slow, the content was exaggerated, and most of all, that it hid Freddie Mercury’s bisexuality. But for me, those reviews couldn’t have been further from the truth.

Queen is incredibly special to England—if you ask any English person about their taste in music, chances are they will mention Queen. Even if they don’t actively listen to them, they’ll more than likely have an understanding and respect for what Queen means to England.

Their music embodies a sort of rebellion and rise against convention that is often found at the heart of English culture, and Freddie Mercury himself symbolises a defiance against stereotypes in his unabashed existence.

As a result, it would make sense that reviews about Bryan Singer’s Bohemian Rhapsody would be particularly critical, as audiences more than likely went in with very high expectations and had hoped that the film would uphold a certain image of Queen.

As for me, I couldn’t have possibly enjoyed the film more if I tried. It was one of the better movie theatre experiences I’ve had this year.

First and foremost, it is safe to say that Rami Malek as Freddie Mercury was perhaps the role he was always meant to play. This is a constant that most critics seem to agree upon, regardless of overall opinions of the film.

It’s hard to assess whether I judged the film as well as I should have, because I was very invested in Malek’s performance to give a critical eye to other facets of the film. But that truly was one of the most beautiful parts of the film; Malek’s performance was emotional, passionate and fun, and everything else seemed to fall into place around him.

As for the details of Mercury’s sexuality, I believe that it beautifully painted a picture of the events that lead him to becoming the sexually confident rockstar that everyone knew him as. The first half of the film depicted the time where he was married to Mary Austin, while simultaneously questioning his sexuality and attempting to shield his bisexual side.

The second half of the film unabashedly demonstrates his acceptance of his sexuality and his catapult into life as a bisexual man. This half of his life (and subsequently, this half of the film) also shows his diagnosis of AIDS, which critics argue the film didn’t go into enough detail about. However, I appreciate the film for keeping out these details; the specificities of AIDS can often be incredibly gruesome, and most fans of Queen know how much Mercury suffered during this time. The film stood as a love letter to Queen and therefore didn’t feel the need to convey extraneous details of his suffering.

Some critics argue—and I agree—that there was a lot that this film glossed over in terms of the telling of Freddie Mercury’s life. But it’s important to remember that in an 134 minute biopic, there’s only so much that can be told—especially when it comes to Mercury, whose life would need an encyclopedia to tell in full.

Additionally, the film’s main focus is on Queen—it isn’t meant to tell only Mercury’s story. The film shows the audience how Queen came to be, the origins of their music, and the relationship between band members. I would argue that focusing solely on the events within Mercury’s life would be a disservice to Queen as a whole, because the band was made up of so much life. In addition, the members of the band were heavily involved in the making of the film, and specified what they did and didn’t want to be told.

I can’t recommend enough that you see Bohemian Rhapsody as soon as you can—if you get the chance, seeing it in theatres feels like an actual rock concert.

Energy Doesn’t Die: Remembering Lil Peep, One Year Later

Lil Peep’s posthumous album Come Over When You’re Sober Pt. 2 comes out 9 November, nearly a year after his death. It will contain eleven brand new tracks, three of which have already been released, including ‘Life is Beautiful’, which came out last night. Here’s why you should care about the late rock star.

The American rapper, born Gustav Åhr, died on 15 November 2017 from an accidental drug overdose. He had just turned 21 and was about to finish his biggest US tour yet. After his death, all of his official music videos gained millions of views overnight, and his music entered the Billboard Hot 100 for the first time.

Suddenly, everybody was crazy for Peep.

An official memorial was held for him in Long Beach, New York. At the same time, his face was projected onto the House of Commons in London. Celebrities that he looked up to, such as Pete Wentz, Good Charlotte and Post Malone, paid their respect in the form of tweets, song covers, and even tattoos.

What was special about Peep was that he was different in every way, and did not try to fit in any box. His music was unique, he was covered in terrible tattoos, he walked in Paris Fashion Week like it was nothing, and even casually came out with a tweet saying, “Yes I’m bisexual,” followed by one saying, “Who wants a kiss.”

He moved to London because he felt like it and bought ugly furniture because he liked that it was ugly. He was idolised by thousands of kids in Russia before ever even visiting the country—oh, and how many other hip hop music videos include trans women of colour?

His music was important because he talked about his mental health and drug problems so openly, which made fans who were going through similar things really relate to him. And that’s what Peep was: an incredibly relatable artist.

He made mistakes, had bad hair days, threw up on stage, loved tweeting things such as “let’s date my g” to Justin Bieber, and so on. He was a normal kid.

Although he was always referred to as a SoundCloud rapper or an emo rapper, neither of those terms can define him. Yes, all of his music before Come Over When You’re Sober Pt. 1 was released on SoundCloud, made up of hip hop beats and lyrics mixed with samples taken from emo bands such as Radiohead, Brand New, and Pierce The Veil—but he was more than that.

However, there is no point in defining Lil Peep, because he was just… Lil Peep. And although it’s already almost been a year since his death, his team is doing an incredible job at keeping his legacy alive.

While you wait for Come Over When You’re Sober Pt. 2 to be released tomorrow, check out the first part of the project on Spotify or Apple Music (or any other platform), and Peep’s previous mixtapes and EPs on SoundCloud.

Slaugherhouse Rulez: But Does It? A Two-Sided Review

Note: this review is not spoiler-free.


Shannon Moyer: Pro

If you’re looking for a fun, slightly-scary romp, then Slaughterhouse Rulez is a good movie for you. With Simon Pegg and Nick Frost as both executive producers and characters in the movie, the film harkens back to the “Cornetto Trilogy” of films featuring the duo.

Slaughterhouse Rulez follows Don Wallace (Finn Cole), a teenage boy sent to the renowned Slaughterhouse boarding school, and his roommate Willoughby (Asa Butterfield) as they navigate the popularity contest that is a UK public school.

Along the way, characters befriend Don and Will, including the brainy Kay (Isabella Laughland) and the stereotypical blonde love-interest Clemsie (Hermione Corfield). While not groundbreaking, this cast of characters are interesting, likeable and push the movie’s plot forward.

The movie touches on important issues, but never stays there too long. Slaughterhouse’s headmaster, played by Michael Sheen, orchestrated for a company to start fracking on the school grounds. That could be the focus, but then a group of protesting hippies appear, and then monsters are introduced—and so on, and so forth.

Some may find this off-putting; on the other hand, I enjoyed the quick pace of the movie. It kept me alert and guessing in a way that many movies don’t.

Slaughterhouse Rulez is also enshrouded in hushed discussion of teenage suicide from the first 10 minutes of the movie. If you want to avoid spoilers, stop here.

Midway through the film, Don stops Will from committing suicide by barging into their dorm room right after Will tried to hang himself. The scene that follows is one of relief, and then this suicide attempt is pretty much ignored for the rest of the movie.

Some might not like how the movie handled this, or call it sloppy writing that the attempt was never circled back to. However, I thought it displayed honesty about how suicide attempts in young adults go—a heartbreaking conversation about life doesn’t always follow. Sometimes, the attempt is foiled and the person just… moves on, like the film does.

Will is alluded to be gay, which isn’t explored in the film—which is okay. I don’t need every film to prove a character’s sexuality to me, especially when it just doesn’t feed into the overall plot. It was just a character point, like him having black hair, and I really liked that.

This movie is fast-paced, a bit chaotic, and full of the clever and subtly humorous writing that is a staple of a Frost/Pegg movie. It made me laugh, kept me on the edge of my seat, and made me genuinely care about whether or not the on-screen cast would survive until the end.

In all honesty, this movie isn’t groundbreaking—and that’s okay. This was 1 hour and 45 minutes of my time that I enjoyed, was glad to see in theatres, and will likely buy when it is released.

It won’t be a blockbuster movie, as indicated by its current 41% on Rotten Tomatoes (as of 7/11/18). But, it’s a campy Pegg and Frost movie that’s entertaining, full of a few laughs and scares, and worth paying the ticket price for.


Cassidy Anthony: Con

If you’re anything like me, then you love Simon Pegg and Nick Frost’s “Cornetto Trilogy” of films. So, when you heard that the two were executive producing and starring in their new film, Slaughterhouse Rulez, you probably ran to the theatre with dreams of Shaun of the Dead and Hot Fuzz floating in your head.

If you subsequently then left the theatre in disappointment and a slight twinge of cinematic anger, you’d still be just like me—because that’s exactly what I did!

I was so excited to love this movie. I came in with extremely high expectations because I love Pegg and Frost’s work. As the movie started, I had the biggest smile on my face, but as it progressed, I could feel it fading quickly.

This film clearly had lots of ambitious ideas. They wanted to make the film fun and exciting, so they absolutely bombarded it with action. From the beginning of the film, we are introduced to characters, settings, events, motivations, and so much that left my head spinning.

This is one of the elements of the film that proves it didn’t know what it wanted to be—rather than intertwining multiple storylines fluidly, it feels like multiple movies were ungracefully mashed together.

Instead of trying to mislead us that clever way that many scary films do, it ended up just leaving us confused.

Slaughterhouse Rulez tried to be clever with its utilisation of constant tropes: the attractive main character, the suicidal best friend, the hot main female character, and so on.

In other parodic films by Pegg and Frost, tropes are usually executed well. However, this film falls victim to these tropes instead of making a commentary about them.

For example, the main female character, Clemsie, has a run in with a weird alien thing (which, by the way, is never really addressed again) which—of course—ends up in her having to take off her button-down shirt and spend the next several scenes in her bra.

This scene adds absolutely nothing to the plot. The “shirtless female” trope is in countless films, and exists only as a wink to the men in the audience.

Had this film not being promoted as a “Simon Pegg film” and I hadn’t gone in expecting Cornetto Trilogy-level cinema, I might have had a different viewing experience. But when a film rides on the coattails of an already incredibly successful trilogy as a way to fill the seats, that film had better deliver—and it simply didn’t.


Have you seen Slaughterhouse Rulez? Let us know what you thought about the film in the comments!

The Top 3 Kingston Cafes You Should Know About

Winter is coming, and as the temperature drops, the desire to warm up with a cup of coffee grows stronger. With so many cafes around, it’s hard to figure out what cuppa is worth your cash.

Here at Loudly, we know the importance of a good cup of coffee (we’re definitely self-proclaimed experts with how much we drink it every day), so we’ve scouted Kingston to find the best cafes to get your daily dose of caffeine.

  1. Fortunella Café (pictured)

Opened four years ago by Goran Brnovic, this hidden gem located in the heart of Kingston is the place to start your day with a good brew, or relax after a long day at work. From the friendly staff that will greet you with a smile, the warm ambiance, table service and the delicious food and beverages, Fortunella is definitely a place you won’t want to miss! There’s a reason they won the Highly Commended for Best Marketing Campaign award at the Kingston Business Excellence Awards.

“I wanted to prove to myself that somebody not from this country is able to bring a solid business In Kingston and I wanted to leave my mark here, and this makes me very proud,” said Brnovic.

Don’t forget to try one of the freshly-made salads or, for those with a sweet tooth, indulge in a piece of cake that compliments your cup of coffee.

2. Wags and Tales

What’s better than sipping on a delicious coffee brew? Spending time with your dog, of course!

At Wags and Tales, you don’t have to worry about leaving your four-legged friend at home—they’re just as welcome as any human customer! With friendly and helpful staff, good food (with gluten free and vegan options as well), excellent coffee and a special menu for dogs, this is definitely the spot to choose for a good brew!

3. Pickled Pantry

Although the quirky name initially makes you think of gherkins, we can assure you there’s no pickles in the coffee! This dainty café minutes away from Surbiton train station offers not a varied menu, with breakfast, brunch and lunch options. Besides their delicious coffee, they also offer a great, relaxing atmosphere where you’ll feel right at home!

“I think that what makes this cafe unique is that we support local businesses in Kingston and as a result, I think our local following, we’ve got quite loyal customers because we support the community,” said Laura Yearwood, owner of Pickled Pantry who took over the previous owners in July this year.

Have we missed your favourite Kingston-area cafe? Where do you think is the best place to unwind with a cuppa after classes? Let us know in the comments!

Restaurant Review: Unity Diner, Shoreditch’s vegan hotspot

London has seen hundreds of vegan restaurants and cafés pop up as veganism gained popularity over recent years, but Shoreditch’s latest addition is a special one − a completely non-profit restaurant.

I went down to Unity Diner to see if it was worth the hype, and let me tell you: it truly was.

Unity Diner, opened by vegan activist Ed Winters (known online as Earthling Ed), donates all the profits made from their delicious food to Winters’ animal rights organisation Surge.

The restaurant has a blue exterior, which really stands out next to Hoxton Market’s dull buildings. Inside, it looks quaint and simple, with vegan art on the wall–the most noticeable one being a painting of several animals on a blue background, with a neon sign saying “the future is VEGAN”. I already know you’re going to see that all over Instagram.

The food was delicious too. I ordered the Surge Burger (and replaced the ranch mayo with hot buffalo sauce because no meal is a real meal without hot sauce), with a side of onion rings.

I nearly cried when I first tasted my food.

The burger was amazing. It didn’t fall apart at any time, as most vegan burgers do, and the flavours worked really well together. I was also surprised to be able to taste every single ingredient, which I loved. It was genuinely the best vegan burger I have ever had.

The onion rings were perfect, and also surprisingly massive. Despite being typically unhealthy dishes, both the onion rings and the Surge Burger tasted like real food.

The meal was affordable, and would have been worth it even if it had been more expensive. The bill included a 12.5% service charge, which goes to their really kind and friendly front of house and kitchen staff.

The work the people at Unity Diner do is incredible. Everything they do is to free animals from oppression and violence, and it’s clear that they are all passionate about it. As explained in a post on the restaurant’s Instagram page, another one of their main aims is to “show the non-vegan public how awesome vegan food is”, and their entire menu is made of mouth-watering vegan versions of popular foods such as chicken wings, mac and cheese, burgers, and more.

There is a lovely feeling of union and belonging in the restaurant, which perfectly explains the choice of name. I recommend it for everyone; vegan or non-vegan.

You can visit Unity Diner for breakfast, lunch, dinner, or drinks any day of the week at 5 Hoxton Market (closest tube station: Old Street).