The 10 Female Artists You Should Be Listening To

There may be a few successful women in music at the moment, but there still aren’t enough. And, let’s be honest, some of them suck anyway.

Here’s a list, in no particular order, of ten female artists and female-fronted bands you may not know, but you should definitely listen to. Oh, and they are all proud feminists and/or members of the LGBTQ+ community too, which we’re always here for.

King Princess

King Princess, born Mikaela Straus, is a 19 year old singer-songwriter from New York, who’s signed to Mark Ronson’s label. She’s smart, funny and incredibly talented. She’s also in the longlist for the BBC Sound of 2019 award (previously won by artists such as Adele and Sam Smith), so you may want to check her out before she takes over the world. Listen to 1950, which is probably her most popular song – Harry Styles even tweeted the lyrics to it!

Billie Eilish

Even if you don’t know Billie Eilish, you know Billie Eilish. The 16 year old (yes, 16) has the voice of an angel, and sells out venues in minutes. She is loved by big stars, such as Ellie Goulding and Julia Roberts, and hopefully will be loved by you too: listen to her latest single when the party’s over, but be careful, the video might freak you out a little.

Greentea Peng

She’s just so awesome. As you can guess from her name, Greentea Peng is a London girl. She has a beautiful jazzy voice, and looks too cool to be real. If you’re into chill music (or are a stoner), she’s the girl for you. Check out Moonchild, and if you’re not into trippy music videos, just focus on her voice.

Kim Petras

Kim Petras is the pop princess we all need. Although she is mostly known for being transgender and having transitioned at a young age, she makes some pretty great music too. Make your Y2K music video dreams come true and check out I Don’t Want It All.

PVRIS

PVRIS (resist the urge to call them puh-vuh-ris – it’s pronounced Paris) are a female-fronted rock band from Massachusetts. Their sound is unique and lead singer Lynn Gunn has an incredibly powerful voice, which sounds exactly the same when she sings live. Listen to White Noise and keep an eye out for them if you’re planning on going to Reading or Leeds Festival!

Willow Smith

You obviously all know Willow Smith. But, forgetting Whip My Hair, did you know she makes good music? She doesn’t release enough of her own, but is featured in a few of her brother’s songs. If you want a taste of what she sounds like, listen to Jimi, you will be pleasantly surprised.

Rico Nasty

Rico Nasty is a 21 year old rapper, mother, and legend in the making. Her music will make you feel like a boss, and she already has six mixtapes out, so your playlist will be on fire. Rico knows she’s weird and lives for it, which should only inspire you to be yourself as well. Check out her song Countin Up, but be careful: it will be stuck in your head for hours.

Yonaka

Yonaka are an alternative band from Brighton. They just toured Europe and the UK with Bring Me The Horizon, and will share a stage with them again at All Points East festival in May. Don’t worry, they don’t sound anything like BMTH, but hopefully the band will bring them the attention that they deserve. Listen to Creature and go wild.

Princess Nokia

If you need some music to boost your confidence, or just to dance along to, listen to Princess Nokia. The American rapper has a unique voice (which can sound very different from song to song) and talks about herself and her life in a candid way in all her songs. She seems to do what she wants, and it’s working out for her. Tomboy is one of her most popular songs, and will give you an idea of what she’s like.

Brooke Candy

Brooke Candy looks and sounds unique. Sia loves her (she’s actually kind of her mentor), so you should too. Brooke is also idolised by the gay community, and it’s clear she takes inspiration from drag queens with her makeup looks. And Brooke Candy is her real name, so you know she was born to be a star. Music wise, her song Nasty is a jam, and there’s nothing better than hearing her refer to a guy as hoe.

Are you a fan of any of these artists? And is there anyone you think should be on the list? Let us know.

Energy Doesn’t Die: Remembering Lil Peep, One Year Later

Lil Peep’s posthumous album Come Over When You’re Sober Pt. 2 comes out 9 November, nearly a year after his death. It will contain eleven brand new tracks, three of which have already been released, including ‘Life is Beautiful’, which came out last night. Here’s why you should care about the late rock star.

The American rapper, born Gustav Åhr, died on 15 November 2017 from an accidental drug overdose. He had just turned 21 and was about to finish his biggest US tour yet. After his death, all of his official music videos gained millions of views overnight, and his music entered the Billboard Hot 100 for the first time.

Suddenly, everybody was crazy for Peep.

An official memorial was held for him in Long Beach, New York. At the same time, his face was projected onto the House of Commons in London. Celebrities that he looked up to, such as Pete Wentz, Good Charlotte and Post Malone, paid their respect in the form of tweets, song covers, and even tattoos.

What was special about Peep was that he was different in every way, and did not try to fit in any box. His music was unique, he was covered in terrible tattoos, he walked in Paris Fashion Week like it was nothing, and even casually came out with a tweet saying, “Yes I’m bisexual,” followed by one saying, “Who wants a kiss.”

He moved to London because he felt like it and bought ugly furniture because he liked that it was ugly. He was idolised by thousands of kids in Russia before ever even visiting the country—oh, and how many other hip hop music videos include trans women of colour?

His music was important because he talked about his mental health and drug problems so openly, which made fans who were going through similar things really relate to him. And that’s what Peep was: an incredibly relatable artist.

He made mistakes, had bad hair days, threw up on stage, loved tweeting things such as “let’s date my g” to Justin Bieber, and so on. He was a normal kid.

Although he was always referred to as a SoundCloud rapper or an emo rapper, neither of those terms can define him. Yes, all of his music before Come Over When You’re Sober Pt. 1 was released on SoundCloud, made up of hip hop beats and lyrics mixed with samples taken from emo bands such as Radiohead, Brand New, and Pierce The Veil—but he was more than that.

However, there is no point in defining Lil Peep, because he was just… Lil Peep. And although it’s already almost been a year since his death, his team is doing an incredible job at keeping his legacy alive.

While you wait for Come Over When You’re Sober Pt. 2 to be released tomorrow, check out the first part of the project on Spotify or Apple Music (or any other platform), and Peep’s previous mixtapes and EPs on SoundCloud.