Violence in Video Games: A 2018 Look at “The Last of Us”

Let me start by posting this Forbes article that was published last year.

The gist of Erik Kain’s article—and of many other video game reviewers’ articles that have been published since the release of The Last of Us II trailer last year—is that the first trailer for newest instalment of the mega-hit post-apocalyptic video game is much too violent.

First off, I think the author’s worries about the tone of the new game are completely founded. The Last of Us is a game about learning to love and trust those around you after going through a terrible loss. It is emotional and devastating in the best way possible, and The Last of Us II seems like it is going to be much darker than the first.

Neil Druckmann, the game director for The Last of Us, said that the next instalment is a “…story about hate.” This doesn’t instil confidence that the game will have a happy tone. However, I feel that the majority of these articles miss the mark when discussing the violence of this game series.

The Last of Us is a game about parasites that infect humanity and turn them into cannibalistic monsters. Many, MANY main characters die (SPOILER: one of them is the main character’s tween daughter about 15 minutes into the game), and the game has a plethora of extremely violent imagery.

It is by no means a happy game.

So when I read articles condemning the violence in the most recent The Last of Us II trailer, I can’t help but think that the context of this series was simply not taken into consideration.

For instance, Julia Alexander’s recent article for polygon.com (Stop Using Violence To Sell Your Game), is a well written discussion about violence against women in video games. However, I see the newest trailer for The Last of Us as being empowering to women—not another example of misogynistic game play.

The only characters that have any lines in this trailer are women. This trailer, now that most of the characters have been named, passes the Bechdel Test (see Hollywood executives? It’s not that hard).

The main character is ripped. Like completely shredded. She doesn’t exist in this post apocalyptic world to be feminine eye candy for the male protagonists. She is realistically shaped to survive in the world she is in. However, who is she saved by? Not by a man, but by two young women (who are not white, but that deserves a whole other conversation about race in video games).

One is androgynous, another example of what real women can look like, and the other is defiant even in the face of defeat. Yes, her arm being broken is shown in graphic detail, but she gets right back up and kills two of her captors despite this. The women are subjected to violence because the world of The Last of Us is violent.

But are they shown to be victims? Do they cower in the face of violence like so many female movie and video game protagonists do?

No. They show that women, no matter if they are a villain, a pair of badass saviours, or a mysterious anti-hero, can survive an apocalyptic world just as well as any man.

We see the survival instincts of Tess, the fortitude of Ellie, and the spirit that makes The Last of Us such a beloved game. So, no—I am not worried about the tone of the next instalment of this series, because from what has been released so far, I can see what makes The Last of Us unique: the fight all people have—no matter their gender, age, race, or sexuality—to keep their humanity and stay alive in an incredibly violent world.

Keep an eye out for the new Last of Us game coming out in 2019!

Netflix Flops: Should You Watch “Don’t Watch This”?

What is it with the human brain and the compulsion of doing something when you’ve been specifically told not to? That’s exactly what I did when I saw Don’t Watch This on NetflixI clicked on it almost immediately.

Now, looking back, maybe I should’ve taken it seriously.

Ghouls, psychos and dark obsessions are the protagonists on Netflix’s brand new horror anthology, Don’t Watch This. It was created as a collaboration between Netflix, Crypt TV and Queer Eye’s executive producers. Good combo, right?

I was more than excited when I read the loglines for the episodes, which don’t have anything in commonnot the theme, not the length, nor the atmosphere. Still, I had been proven before that horror anthologies could, in fact, work.

Unfortunately, what I was served wasn’t much more than another XX or ABC’s of Death.

It pains me to say this but Don’t Watch This failed to bring originality, scares and overall entertainment.

Perhaps the lack of common denominator is what caused the anthology to collapseit didn’t have any grounds to stand on. In spite of all the bad, it has its good sides. I really enjoyed two shorts: Incommodum, the third one, and Antoni Psycho, the last one.

Incommodum is an experimental short, with no conventional narrative; therefore all of our need of clear storyline and resolution should be thrown out of the window when watching it. It shows distorted images of “ominous symbols, bodily horrors and other frights [that] converge in a surreal nightmare that’s not for the squeamish”, as one of the producers kindly wrote.

The last one is an homage to Mary Harron’s iconic American Psycho. In this short, Antoni Porowski, one of the fab five from Queer Eye appears as himself in a parody that feeds from American Psycho and the personality’s fame after the success of Queer Eye.

Its style and tone are perfectly copied from Harron’s feature, as it shows a duplicate from the opening scene where Christian Bale’s character gets ready for his day, voicing his day-to-day routines. Both in the feature and in the short, the voice-over is as painfully boring as it is important for the character development. Although the protagonist on the short film is a real person, both versions explore the absurd of human vanity.

As I mentioned before, Don’t Watch This is not Netflix’s best, but it is worth a watchdespite its namefor its novelty. It is Netflix’s first attempt to swim in uncharted waters and even betterit is really, really short!