Slaugherhouse Rulez: But Does It? A Two-Sided Review

Note: this review is not spoiler-free.


Shannon Moyer: Pro

If you’re looking for a fun, slightly-scary romp, then Slaughterhouse Rulez is a good movie for you. With Simon Pegg and Nick Frost as both executive producers and characters in the movie, the film harkens back to the “Cornetto Trilogy” of films featuring the duo.

Slaughterhouse Rulez follows Don Wallace (Finn Cole), a teenage boy sent to the renowned Slaughterhouse boarding school, and his roommate Willoughby (Asa Butterfield) as they navigate the popularity contest that is a UK public school.

Along the way, characters befriend Don and Will, including the brainy Kay (Isabella Laughland) and the stereotypical blonde love-interest Clemsie (Hermione Corfield). While not groundbreaking, this cast of characters are interesting, likeable and push the movie’s plot forward.

The movie touches on important issues, but never stays there too long. Slaughterhouse’s headmaster, played by Michael Sheen, orchestrated for a company to start fracking on the school grounds. That could be the focus, but then a group of protesting hippies appear, and then monsters are introduced—and so on, and so forth.

Some may find this off-putting; on the other hand, I enjoyed the quick pace of the movie. It kept me alert and guessing in a way that many movies don’t.

Slaughterhouse Rulez is also enshrouded in hushed discussion of teenage suicide from the first 10 minutes of the movie. If you want to avoid spoilers, stop here.

Midway through the film, Don stops Will from committing suicide by barging into their dorm room right after Will tried to hang himself. The scene that follows is one of relief, and then this suicide attempt is pretty much ignored for the rest of the movie.

Some might not like how the movie handled this, or call it sloppy writing that the attempt was never circled back to. However, I thought it displayed honesty about how suicide attempts in young adults go—a heartbreaking conversation about life doesn’t always follow. Sometimes, the attempt is foiled and the person just… moves on, like the film does.

Will is alluded to be gay, which isn’t explored in the film—which is okay. I don’t need every film to prove a character’s sexuality to me, especially when it just doesn’t feed into the overall plot. It was just a character point, like him having black hair, and I really liked that.

This movie is fast-paced, a bit chaotic, and full of the clever and subtly humorous writing that is a staple of a Frost/Pegg movie. It made me laugh, kept me on the edge of my seat, and made me genuinely care about whether or not the on-screen cast would survive until the end.

In all honesty, this movie isn’t groundbreaking—and that’s okay. This was 1 hour and 45 minutes of my time that I enjoyed, was glad to see in theatres, and will likely buy when it is released.

It won’t be a blockbuster movie, as indicated by its current 41% on Rotten Tomatoes (as of 7/11/18). But, it’s a campy Pegg and Frost movie that’s entertaining, full of a few laughs and scares, and worth paying the ticket price for.


Cassidy Anthony: Con

If you’re anything like me, then you love Simon Pegg and Nick Frost’s “Cornetto Trilogy” of films. So, when you heard that the two were executive producing and starring in their new film, Slaughterhouse Rulez, you probably ran to the theatre with dreams of Shaun of the Dead and Hot Fuzz floating in your head.

If you subsequently then left the theatre in disappointment and a slight twinge of cinematic anger, you’d still be just like me—because that’s exactly what I did!

I was so excited to love this movie. I came in with extremely high expectations because I love Pegg and Frost’s work. As the movie started, I had the biggest smile on my face, but as it progressed, I could feel it fading quickly.

This film clearly had lots of ambitious ideas. They wanted to make the film fun and exciting, so they absolutely bombarded it with action. From the beginning of the film, we are introduced to characters, settings, events, motivations, and so much that left my head spinning.

This is one of the elements of the film that proves it didn’t know what it wanted to be—rather than intertwining multiple storylines fluidly, it feels like multiple movies were ungracefully mashed together.

Instead of trying to mislead us that clever way that many scary films do, it ended up just leaving us confused.

Slaughterhouse Rulez tried to be clever with its utilisation of constant tropes: the attractive main character, the suicidal best friend, the hot main female character, and so on.

In other parodic films by Pegg and Frost, tropes are usually executed well. However, this film falls victim to these tropes instead of making a commentary about them.

For example, the main female character, Clemsie, has a run in with a weird alien thing (which, by the way, is never really addressed again) which—of course—ends up in her having to take off her button-down shirt and spend the next several scenes in her bra.

This scene adds absolutely nothing to the plot. The “shirtless female” trope is in countless films, and exists only as a wink to the men in the audience.

Had this film not being promoted as a “Simon Pegg film” and I hadn’t gone in expecting Cornetto Trilogy-level cinema, I might have had a different viewing experience. But when a film rides on the coattails of an already incredibly successful trilogy as a way to fill the seats, that film had better deliver—and it simply didn’t.


Have you seen Slaughterhouse Rulez? Let us know what you thought about the film in the comments!

The Bloody Truth Behind Menstruation

Menstruation – It’s painful, bloody, and downright annoying. The unpleasant yet necessary cycle of menstruation affects nearly 50% of the world’s population — yet the topic is incredibly hush-hush and deemed taboo to speak about.

Anyone with a vagina has been there: you need to ask a friend for a sanitary product, but you’re uncomfortable saying the words out loud. But why is this? What is it about periods that make women feel uncomfortable to speak outwardly about them?

Depictions of menstruation in media – including film, advertisements, video games, social media, etc. – have always been particularly problematic. The media’s representation generally does not convey what menstruation is actually like, but rather demonstrates a glorified version that seeks to make audience members more comfortable with a manipulated version of menstruation.

Ads are especially guilty of adopting this sugarcoated image of menstruation. These advertisements are usually selling sanitary products and, in order to boost sales, depict the women on screen as being happy and physically active, conveying the idea that if you buy these tampons, you will also be happy and active!

This image is particularly absurd to most period-having humans; when you’re on your period, all you want to do is curl up in a ball and cry. PMS (premenstrual syndrome) is painful and uncomfortable and ugly–and no matter how effective a tampon is, women on their period typically don’t want to perform a ballet recital or go rock climbing.

Advertisements are also notorious for specifically not showing period blood, despite the fact that their products exist for the sake of combating menstrual bleeding. Rather than the standard colour of blood – red – advertisements use a mysterious blue liquid to represent period blood.

The use of this blue liquid isn’t only found in sanitary product commercials; indeed, it can be seen in advertisements for toothpaste, diapers, paper towels, and more. Why do advertisements do this?

This sterile blue colour is often used in advertisements to denote cleanliness. The blue liquid elicits images of pure, clean water, and directly opposes any unsavoury thoughts of blood or bodily fluids. 

The use of this blue liquid also stems from quite problematic origins, some of which are deeply rooted in cultural norms. This allusion to cleanliness perpetuates the notion that menstruation is unclean and impure, a belief shared by the texts of many cultures and religions. This idea is also often seen in mainstream media and films, such as Carrie (1976), in which Carrie’s mother believes that her period is a symbol of sin.

While menstrual product advertisements do not necessarily mean to imply that periods are impure, companies tend to portray menstruation in a veil of beauty and happiness.

This perpetuates the notion that menstruation should be a clean experience, as a means to combat the inherent impurities of menstrual bleeding. This depiction is particularly effective as advertisements are ubiquitous and accessible, and therefore viewed by larger audiences, which subconsciously perpetuates these ideals without audiences knowing it.

The depiction of menstruation extends past advertisements. Not only is it misrepresented in mainstream media, but it is often actively censored.

A photo that poet and activist Rupi Kaur posted to her Instagram account of her bleeding through her pants was flagged and removed from the Internet. Since the photo technically met the official Instagram guidelines, it was eventually reuploaded; however, Kaur did not go quietly into that good night.

rupikaur-period1-454x341 Photo credit: Rupi Kaur

In response, she wrote, “I will not apologise for not feeding the ego and pride of misogynist society that will have my body in an underwear but not be okay with a small leak.  When your pages are filled with countless photos/accounts where women (so many who are underage) are objectified.”

This, and sanitised media depictions, are just some of the many ways that menstruation is stigmatised and stereotyped and deemed gross or offensive, ultimately making it a taboo subject.

While this information can be disheartening, it is important to remember to celebrate companies that are attempting initiatives to end stigmas surrounding menstruation.

For example, Libresse is an international brand of feminine hygiene products that has recently initiated a campaign called “Blood Normal” that seeks to “banish the blue liquid that conventionally stands in for period blood in ads and instead shows real-life scenarios of young women dealing with their periods.”

The hope is that more mainstream companies will adopt similar ideals, ultimately working to collectively end stigmas surrounding menstruation. In the end, perhaps someday, women may not have to whisper about their periods and treat them like they’re secrets.

Watch the Blood Normal campaign video here.