We the People and the US Shutdown

25 days. 

The United States government has been in a partial shutdown for 25 days, with no end in sight.

This is the longest shutdown that has occurred in the entire history of the US, with the previous record awarded to Bill Clinton’s 21 day shutdown in 1995.

The Guardian has sources that say President Trump told advisers that this shutdown is a sort of win for him, but roughly 800,000 government employees are now working without pay.

Parts of the government have shut down or are operating with skeleton crews, with more employees giving their resignation as the days wear on—or, at least, trying to get a job in the meanwhile.

That’s the rub: it’s the American people who are being directly affected by Trump’s shutdown.

While Trump tweeted yesterday morning, “I’ve been waiting all weekend. Democrats must get to work now. Border must be secured!”, there are families who cannot make rent this month because of his stubbornness.

Americans have been through this all before—I distinctly remember the 2013 government shutdown under Obama, which lasted 16 days, and stupidly joking about whether or not I had to go to classes during the shutdown.

That was bad, but this is worse.

800,000 federal employees haven’t received a paycheck since January 11. As the days tick by, and bills and financial responsibilities begin to accumulate, the situation becomes more dire.

My brother and his very pregnant wife, who were in the process of buying a house, cannot proceed with the purchase until the shutdown is lifted.

Social Security checks are still being issued, since they are tax-funded, but I worry daily about when that will change and affect my family.

Meanwhile, Trump sits by, determined to get his precious wall by any means necessary. Someone has to cave in this situation, and whether it’s the Republicans or the Democrats, the House or the Senate, things have to change.

And for the sake of the American people, I hope it’s soon.

 

Queer Christianity: Finding Acceptance in a Conservative America

I am an American. I am a lifelong, believing Christian. And this September, I came out as pansexual.

The three of these identifiers do not often mix well, and I find myself often facing crossroads—do I stay in the closet around my Christian friends? Do I hide my religious identity around my queer friends?

More often than not, I just stay quiet—which is pretty sad, truth be told. But, in the current political climate of America, who wants to out themselves?

When I finally came to terms with my sexuality, I was at “the world’s largest Christian university” in Virginia. I was surrounded by southern, conservative peers who would sneer that the “homosexuals” are going to hell.

That’s when the panic set in. How do you justify your sexuality with your religion, if everyone says your religion hates queer people? I knew I was still a Christian, and I could never stop believing in God and Jesus, but I felt lost.

“If God hates queer people”, I wondered, “why would He make me like this? God doesn’t make mistakes, does He?”

This fear and confusion is, unfortunately, not unique to my experience. Alex Burchnell, who runs the Twitter @AlexChrisQCFV (Queer Christian Family Values) with his husband, Chris, in the American south, has experienced similar feelings in his Christian walk.

“I never questioned my identity in Christ until I came out in my first year of college,” Alex said. “I saw how the church turned on those in the LGBTQ community and started questioning if I would believe in a God who would allow this.”

Like Alex, I was also angry and confused. I had a hard time separating the behaviour of Christians from the God they worshipped.

“It wasn’t until I met other Christians who showed me that there were people who weren’t bigoted and still believed strongly in Christ,” Alex said. “I started reading more about the life of Jesus and learning for myself rather than relying on what others told me.”

This was an important step in my own reconciliation of sexuality—inputting Bible verses into different translations, crying on the shoulders of my Christian friends who embraced me wholeheartedly, and remembering what it was about God that made me love Him in the first place.

When I came out to friends, I had a mostly positive reaction (after all, I chose good friends) but my family found themselves angry and hurt. When the reactions aren’t as positive as a queer Christian would hope for, Chris has advice for them.

“It doesn’t matter what you do or who you are attracted to, God is love, and His love is infinite,”  said Chris. “Even if you have to hide it for a while, there is no reason you can’t be a queer Christian. There are others out there, so you’re not alone. God isn’t the issue, it’s the people who claim to follow Him. God is acceptance. People are conditional.”

Ultimately, your religion can go hand-in-hand with your sexuality. There is no way to “pray away” your feelings (trust me, most of us have tried). No amount of hellfire-and-brimstone sermons will spook your queerness out of your soul.

God loves us. We are fearfully and wonderfully made in His image, and He doesn’t make mistakes.

If you’re a queer Christian looking for support, I recommend the #FaithfullyLGBT tag on Twitter to link up with queer theologians, pastors and believers who can share their advice.