London Celebrates Great Women of Colour at Charity Event

The UK charity Black Heroes Foundation shone a spotlight on the lives and achievements of women of colour in a charity event on 30 October.

The London’s Greatest Women of Colour event highlighted those women who had a significant impact on black culture. Ground-breakers, such as Connie Mark, Claudia Jones and Mary Seacole, were lauded and applauded for their achievements.

Guests from around the world—including the High Commissioner of Jamaica—enjoyed an evening filled with traditional soul food, live music from artists like reggae artist Lloyd Brown, and diverse talks about London’s black women.

The event was organised to raise funds in order to bring back the Black Heroes in the Hall of Fame inspired show at the Hackney Empire Theatre in October 2019.

“This show was about celebrating our history and actually talking about and giving people information about our great historians, scientists, about our great entertainers and sportsmen,” said Joyce Fraser, founder of the Black Heroes Foundation.

The Black Heroes show, created in 1987 as a community project, became very popular and was even taken abroad to Jamaica and United States, where it won many awards including the Spirit of Detroit.

“It went into the penitentiary in Chicago and the in-mates cried because they didn’t know their history,” added Fraser.

The BHF was created in the memory of Peter Randolph Fraser, known as “Flip Fraser,” who was the creator of the Black Heroes in the Hall of Fame show. Fraser was also the first editor of The Voice, the only British national black weekly newspaper still operating in the United Kingdom.

The charity’s main focus is to develop awareness regarding black culture, as well as provide cultural and artistic initiatives in the community.

BHF is encouraging anyone who is interested in learning more about significant people of colour and black culture to contact them or attend one of their Soul Food Cafe events, which take place on the last Thursday of every month at Leilani Restaurant & Ashanti Restaurant in London.

#YouTubeBlack: A Review

Last week in Washington D.C., the black community on YouTube were left overshadowed beyond algorithms, as the second year of the annual fan fest, #YouTubeBlack, took place.

Supporters of the event and YouTubers alike took to Twitter and their channels to display their excitement—but those who disagreed with the event used social media to prompt a debate on the intentions of #YouTubeBlack.

They accused the event of inciting inequality. However, the event was created to address the racial inequalities that currently exist on the platform. Despite the backlash, #YouTubeBlack is being positively recognised by the majority as a space for celebration of black contributions to the globally recognised platform—and there’s nothing wrong with that!

When individuals claim that #YouTubeBlack is exclusory, it takes away from what the event is trying to do–create visibility for black content-makers.

One Twitter user stated, “It’s segregating content specifically by black people for the enjoyment of black people. That is the opposite of equality.” This was just one of the accusations that divided Twitter users on the issue.

But what’s more is that for years now, black content creators have been battling to be heard amongst YouTube algorithms who don’t display their content as frequently as other well-known creators. This means that many black YouTubers’ content is being lost within their own platform.

Attendees of #YouTubeBlack, such as Kingsley (who has 2.9m million subscribers), De’arra & Ken (5m subscribers) and LaToya Forever (1.4m subscribers) are just some of the well-known black content creators who you are unlikely to see on the trending or recommended pages of YouTube, despite their large following.

This is just evidence of how creators of colour have fallen victim to platforms that use algorithms to promote video-makers, but have lacked in promoting the black community as equally as other races.

The majority of entertainers of colour we see in our trending pages are generally globally known and Grammy award-winning musicians, who don’t reflect all genres that black creators represent within the social platform.

By allowing events like #YouTubeBlack to exist, these voices can be heard. The annual fest not only gives fans the chance to meet their favourite black YouTubers, but also unites the voices of the new and existing generation of black YouTubers.

This allows more creators who believe they couldn’t make it because of their ethnicity to be inspired and grow. It’s significant to see more black people celebrating these front-facing roles as they support and encourage others within the community, spreading a message that their opportunities are just as tangible and equal as any other race.

With a demographic of 50 million creators on YouTube, many agree that #YouTubeBlack is about uplifting an overlooked community amongst the mass shared platform.

By allowing black creatives to thrive by celebrating, supporting and mentoring fellow black creators, they can gain recognition within and beyond their community.

As one Twitter user defends, “#YouTubeBlack was created to acknowledge black creators who are often stuffed under the algorithm. Black YouTubers do not get nearly as much visibility/opportunities as other races, yet are consistently the forefront of every trend. The initiative was created to help balance that.”