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Zero waste living for students: dream or possibility?

By now, everyone knows about the climate change issues that our planet is dealing with. And while some people choose to ignore the signs, there are others trying hard to protect the environment and reduce the threats to Mother Nature. From reducing the amount of water and energy used in our households for general living, to becoming vegan, everyone has their own method, and one in particular is starting to pick up: zero waste living.

We’ve all seen the bloggers who praise this lifestyle and show off their tiny amount of trash made in a year or more in a cute Mason jar. Buzzfeed even has videos on how to make zero waste meals. It’s an appealing idealistic way of living for anyone who cares about the environment. But is this lifestyle suitable for a student?

At a first glance, not so much. The number of farmers markets and zero waste shops where you can buy products in bulk using your own packaging, is relatively small compared to regular stores, even in London. In addition to that, it might seem cheaper to buy pre-packaged produce and items than the more eco-friendly alternative.

However, Ilmira Murni, a student at the University College London, claims the zero waste student life is easier than we think.

“I would argue that it is cheaper! There are a lot of eateries and cafes that offer discounts when you bring your own cups/Tupperware,” she says. “I also do not participate in fast fashion and only buy clothes second hand when I absolutely need to. I save a lot of money caring for the environment.”

A zero waste lifestyle advocate herself, she decided to follow this way in order to join the fight against wasting resources and trying to protect the environment.

While she does agree that it is easier to follow this lifestyle in London than in other areas—as it is easier to find zero waste free shops around the capital— she strongly believes that every student is capable of living like this without any major difficulties.

“It doesn’t take more than just shopping at different places, or supporting local farmers more. There is very little you need to invest into financial when you adopt this lifestyle, just use what you already have,” she says.

“Think about what you throw away everyday and swap that out for a reusable option. That’s the easiest way to start and probably where you will make most impact. If you drink coffee everyday, thats 300 cups at least a year going to landfill. So identify high impact changes first: menstrual options, bottles and coffee cups, cutlery and others,” Ilmira adds.

Would you ever try living zero waste? Let us know what you think in the comments below!