Energy Doesn’t Die: Remembering Lil Peep, One Year Later

Lil Peep’s posthumous album Come Over When You’re Sober Pt. 2 comes out 9 November, nearly a year after his death. It will contain eleven brand new tracks, three of which have already been released, including ‘Life is Beautiful’, which came out last night. Here’s why you should care about the late rock star.

The American rapper, born Gustav Åhr, died on 15 November 2017 from an accidental drug overdose. He had just turned 21 and was about to finish his biggest US tour yet. After his death, all of his official music videos gained millions of views overnight, and his music entered the Billboard Hot 100 for the first time.

Suddenly, everybody was crazy for Peep.

An official memorial was held for him in Long Beach, New York. At the same time, his face was projected onto the House of Commons in London. Celebrities that he looked up to, such as Pete Wentz, Good Charlotte and Post Malone, paid their respect in the form of tweets, song covers, and even tattoos.

What was special about Peep was that he was different in every way, and did not try to fit in any box. His music was unique, he was covered in terrible tattoos, he walked in Paris Fashion Week like it was nothing, and even casually came out with a tweet saying, “Yes I’m bisexual,” followed by one saying, “Who wants a kiss.”

He moved to London because he felt like it and bought ugly furniture because he liked that it was ugly. He was idolised by thousands of kids in Russia before ever even visiting the country—oh, and how many other hip hop music videos include trans women of colour?

His music was important because he talked about his mental health and drug problems so openly, which made fans who were going through similar things really relate to him. And that’s what Peep was: an incredibly relatable artist.

He made mistakes, had bad hair days, threw up on stage, loved tweeting things such as “let’s date my g” to Justin Bieber, and so on. He was a normal kid.

Although he was always referred to as a SoundCloud rapper or an emo rapper, neither of those terms can define him. Yes, all of his music before Come Over When You’re Sober Pt. 1 was released on SoundCloud, made up of hip hop beats and lyrics mixed with samples taken from emo bands such as Radiohead, Brand New, and Pierce The Veil—but he was more than that.

However, there is no point in defining Lil Peep, because he was just… Lil Peep. And although it’s already almost been a year since his death, his team is doing an incredible job at keeping his legacy alive.

While you wait for Come Over When You’re Sober Pt. 2 to be released tomorrow, check out the first part of the project on Spotify or Apple Music (or any other platform), and Peep’s previous mixtapes and EPs on SoundCloud.

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minniegaio

I'm passionate about vegan food and pop punk.